life

Metro

I was in the metro today and the train arrived at the stop as usual, but as it came to a complete stop the doors didn't open. The conductor was obviously trying repeatedly to open the doors because the red lights at the top of the cars kept flickering on and off (they usually stay on when the metro doors are open).

After about 2 minutes trying to get the doors open, the conductor shut down the metro train, so the air vents stopped and lights when out for a brief moment as she/he restarted the engines. It's perfectly logical that this is possible as after all, they have got to start the trains at the beginning of the day to get them moving along the metro lines but it was just bizarre to see a train in its powered down state.

The good news is whatever restarting the engines does fixed the problem - the doors opened immediately after the conductor "reset" the metro train.

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My theorem

timein day= 1d * 24h * 60m * 60s / (age/10)

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NiN

I went to see NiN's Lights in the Sky tour at the Bell Center last week, it was one amazing (light) show! If they're coming by your city and you're a fan of NiN, you should definitely consider going.

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Welcome to the Matrix.

I like the Matrix trilogy more every time I watch it... There's some pretty interesting ideas in the movie. With the capabilities of technology growing every day, I don't believe we are going to be imprisoned by machines anytime soon but I do believe that the idea of a computer-generated "reality" will become, well, a reality pretty soon.

What is real? It's going to be interesting to see how reality (both the sense of the word's meaning and the experiences we all retain from this "reality"), will change. If computers can interact with the nervous system, how will we be able to tell the difference between the current and computer-projected realities? In theory, the two would be indistinguishable and as with all other digital technology, chances are the digital projection of reality would be even better than the real thing. Either way, linking human brains to machines is going to bring about both new possibilities and vulnerabilities... Ad-hock networks of brains would be something very cool - imagine swapping digitized memories, complete with a sense of smell, touch, etc that you could replay any number of times. Work experience/skills could be transferred as well, which would make education easier and quicker. The gaming industry would be revolutionalized... You wouldn't play games anymore, you'd experience them. Interact with them.

On the other hand, I bet it won't be long before brain-malware (brain32.mydoom O_o) appears too. But that's a whole other topic...

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Gazette and CTV interview!

Last May (the week of the 21st) I was interviewed by the Gazette by surprise - one of my clients had sent a letter to the Gazette and they wanted to interview me about Diffingo and the free support/software I offer. Then the same day that the article was published CTV asked for and interview as well! If you'd like to have a look, here is the article and the CTV interview:

Gazette article (PNG image, 5.8MB)
CTV Interview (QuickTime/MP4 movie, 3.3MB)

Need QuickTime? Get it here.

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